Fossil Shark Teeth

The fossil shark teeth come from several different types of ancient sharks including tiger, mako, sand, otodus, lamna, and an ancient shark called carcharodon megalodon.  If a shark loses a tooth while biting into something, another tooth from the second row would replace the missing tooth within four minutes.  Thus many teeth were lost over the lifetime of a shark.

Carcharodon Megalodon: This ancient shark lived between 15 million and 25 million years ago.  The ancient sharks could grow up to 50 feet in length.  The carcharodon megalodon had many rows of sharp teeth.  The carcharodon teeth have a single point, often with serrated edges.  These teeth vary in size from small to large.  The end of the tooth or root is often preserved.  The fossil shark teeth are often found in phosphate mines, and sometimes in beach areas.  Some teeth are found by divers.  A fossil shark tooth is easy to tell from a modern day shark tooth as a fossil tooth is made of stone; the modern tooth is not.

White South Pacific Carcharodon Megalodon: This shark also lived 15 to 25 million years ago. This tooth however was found on the bottom of the ocean during a tooth searching expedition. A complicated process make these the most difficult teeth to find in the world. The teeth are black when found, and are then polished to reveal a bright and clean specimen.

Another ancient shark was the otodus.  The otodus teeth are easy to differentiate from the shark tooth as they have two smaller side points on either side of the tooth. The teeth are often preserved with nice sharp edges. They are between 15 million and 25 million years old.

9 results
Pacific Megalodon Shark Tooth
Megalodon Shark Tooth
Otodus/Lamna Shark Tooth
Otodus/Lamna Shark Tooth
Megalodon Shark Tooth
Pacific Megalodon Shark Tooth
Shark Tooth: Carcharadon Megalodon
Shark Tooth: Carcharadon Megalodon
Shark Tooth: Carcharadon Megalodon
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